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The core stage of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) Artemis 2 rocket, set to launch astronauts to the moon in 2025, has left the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. The 212-foot booster, featuring four RS-25 engines, was transported to NASA’s Pegasus barge for shipment to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This marks a significant step in the Artemis program, with the Artemis 2 mission aiming to send four astronauts around the moon, the first such trip since the 1970s. The event was celebrated with a local marching band and witnessed by Michoud workers and guests.

Read more at: https://www.space.com/nasa-artemis-2-sls-booster-stage-michoud-rollout-july-16

Astronauts face challenges with bodily functions during spacewalks, which can last up to nine hours. Currently, they use the Maximum Absorbency Garment (MAG), an advanced diaper, to manage urination. Researchers propose an in-suit water recovery system to filter and recycle urine into potable water, addressing the limitations of diapers and providing more hydration. This system, though bulky and weighing about 8 kg, uses a dual forward osmosis-reverse osmosis (FO-RO) filtration method to ensure clean water. This approach is less advanced than the fictional stillsuits from “Dune” but offers practical benefits for astronauts.

Read more at: https://hackaday.com/2024/07/14/using-forward-and-reverse-osmosis-to-let-astronaut-eva-suits-produce-fresh-water-from-urine/

Astronauts remain confident in Boeing’s space capsule’s ability to safely return them to Earth, despite previous failures. They trust the improvements and rigorous testing conducted by Boeing, believing the issues have been resolved. The capsule is part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, aimed at providing reliable transportation to and from the International Space Station.

Read more at: https://www.ksl.com/article/51065325/astronauts-confident-boeing-space-capsule-can-safely-return-them-to-earth-despite-failures

NASA aims to send astronauts to Mars by the 2030s, advancing with the Crew Health and Performance Exploration Analog (CHAPEA) program. The first yearlong simulated mission was completed by four crew members in a 1,700-square-foot, 3D-printed habitat at Johnson Space Center. This mission, lasting 378 days, tested living conditions on Mars, marking a significant step toward the goal. Dr. Suzanne Bell highlighted the mission’s success in understanding human endurance in resource-restricted environments. CHAPEA will continue with more analog missions to prepare for Mars exploration.

Read more at: https://abcnews.go.com/US/nasa-hopes-send-astronauts-mars-2030s/story?id=111859633