Search

A team of engineers has developed the world’s fastest camera, capable of capturing images at an astonishing rate of 156 trillion frames per second. This groundbreaking technology, known as T-CUP, uses a new imaging technique called compressed ultrafast photography (CUP) to capture images in real-time at an unprecedented speed. The camera has the potential to revolutionize various fields, from biomedical research to industrial and scientific applications, by allowing for the visualization of ultrafast phenomena that were previously impossible to capture. The team hopes that this advancement will open up new possibilities for understanding and studying the world around us.

Read more at: https://www.livescience.com/technology/engineering/worlds-fastest-camera-captures-images-at-156-trillion-frames-per-second

A team of mathematicians and engineers have developed new techniques for controlling the orbits of spacecraft, allowing for more precise and efficient navigation in space. These methods, based on the mathematical field of geometry, involve manipulating the shape and orientation of orbits to avoid collisions and optimize fuel usage. The team’s work has already been successfully tested on a satellite in Earth’s orbit and could have significant implications for future space missions. This innovative approach to spacecraft navigation highlights the important role of mathematics in advancing space exploration.

Read more at: https://www.quantamagazine.org/geometers-engineer-new-tools-to-wrangle-spacecraft-orbits-20240415/

A team of engineers and scientists from Oregon State University are training a four-legged robot to walk on the moon. The robot, named “Astro,” is being tested on the rugged terrain of Mount Hood to simulate the conditions on the lunar surface. The project is part of a larger effort by NASA to develop technology for future moon missions. The team hopes that Astro’s ability to navigate difficult terrain and collect data will contribute to advancements in space exploration.

Read more at: https://www.koin.com/news/oregon/robot-dog-training-to-walk-on-the-moon-on-mt-hood/

NASA engineers have identified the root cause of a malfunction on the Voyager 1 spacecraft, which has been exploring the outer reaches of our solar system for over 40 years. The issue, which caused the spacecraft’s thrusters to fire unexpectedly, was traced back to a single computer chip that had degraded over time. Despite this setback, the Voyager 1 mission continues to provide valuable data and insights into the mysteries of our universe.

Read more at: https://www.techspot.com/news/102543-nasa-engineers-identify-root-voyager-1-malfunction.html

NASA engineers have discovered the cause of the garbled data being transmitted by the Voyager 1 spacecraft, which is currently located outside of our solar system. The issue is due to a delay in the spacecraft’s aging computer system, causing it to send back incorrect data. Engineers are working on a solution to fix the problem and restore accurate data transmission.

Read more at: https://www.livescience.com/space/space-exploration/nasa-engineers-discover-why-voyager-1-is-sending-a-stream-of-gibberish-from-outside-our-solar-system