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A drug has extended the lifespans of lab animals by nearly 25%, leading to hopes it could slow human ageing. Treated mice, dubbed “supermodel grannies,” appeared more youthful, healthier, and developed fewer cancers. The drug is currently being tested in humans, but its effectiveness remains uncertain. Researchers from MRC Laboratory, Imperial College London, and Duke-NUS Medical School focused on interleukin-11, a protein that increases with age and contributes to inflammation, influencing the ageing process.

Read more at: https://www.bbc.com/news/articles/cv2gr3x3xkno

Headlines in the West of England focused on human remains found in suitcases on Clifton Suspension Bridge and Ollie Watkins’ last-minute goal securing England’s Euro 2024 final spot. Police seek a man who fled the scene of the remains. Additionally, Sir James Dyson announced plans to cut 1,000 UK jobs in a global restructuring effort.

Read more at: https://news.google.com/rss/articles/CBMiLmh0dHBzOi8vd3d3LmJiYy5jb20vbmV3cy9hcnRpY2xlcy9jZDE2Z3plOGQ5em_SATJodHRwczovL3d3dy5iYmMuY29tL25ld3MvYXJ0aWNsZXMvY2QxNmd6ZThkOXpvLmFtcA?oc=5&hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

British police discovered human remains in a west London apartment, believed to be linked to body parts found in Bristol earlier this week. Investigations began after two suitcases containing male remains were found on Clifton Suspension Bridge. A 36-year-old man was arrested and released without charge. Authorities are now seeking Yostin Andres Mosquera, a 24-year-old Colombian national, in connection with the case. Police have released Mosquera’s photo and believe they know the victims’ identities, though formal identification is pending.

Read more at: https://edition.cnn.com/2024/07/12/uk/uk-manhunt-human-remains-intl-hnk/index.html

Research suggests that a plague outbreak may have caused the Neolithic collapse, a population decline in northern Europe 5,000 years ago. DNA from human remains in Sweden and Denmark revealed that 17% of 108 studied individuals were infected with plague. In Falbygden, 32% of 38 people across six generations had plague, indicating three distinct waves of the disease. Genomic analysis of Yersinia pestis strains showed the last wave was likely more virulent and capable of person-to-person transmission, potentially causing an epidemic.

Read more at: https://www.theguardian.com/society/article/2024/jul/11/neolithic-population-collapse-may-have-been-caused-by-plague-researchers-say